Dr Aloysius (Loui) Monteiro, Globetrotting UN Economist, Calls it a Day

June 1, 2021

Aloysius (Loui) David Monteiro, my brother-in-law, passed away in a hospital in Bengaluru on June 1, 2021. I was close to him over the years as brothers-in-law, and am handicapped on this day of grief to write anything fresh, although he richly deserves that effort.

Of late, the professional life of Dr Aloysius (Loui) David Monteiro had become a routine. He was driven to his IT-HRD consultancy office at Raheja Arcade in Koramangala, Bengaluru, from a nearby residential hub. His consultancy, Amboseli Professional Associates, is mainly focussed on the recruitment of IT professionals. Occasionally, he would get nostalgic about his globetrotting days stretching over two decades. That part of his life played so much on his mind that he penned his autobiography so that his grandchildren, who are all abroad, would have something to read and feel proud of their pedigree. The book, titled My Journey From The Village, traces his travels from Kiram, the village of his birth, to distant countries across the world, not as a tourist but as an advisor with the United Nations. But, we must start at the beginning.

Dr Loui, third of the four sons of Santhan and Asses Monteiro, was born in Kiram, the farming village at the base of the Omanzoor-Bondel plateaus, on January 27, 1931. He had his primary education at St Lawrence Church School at Bondel and later, up to BA, which he finished in 1952, at St Aloysius College. He did his MA in economics through Loyola College in (then) Madras, passing out in1954. Concurrently, he tried his luck, unsuccessfully, at getting into the IAS.

Looking for a job, Dr Loui went to Bombay and landed one in the Accountant General’s Office. The next job was at the Forward Markets Commission. Then he switched over to the Small Industries Service Institute, his work mainly involving project reports. He concurrently worked for his PhD degree. Next, he worked with the Economics Intelligence Department of the Bank of India. Then he went on a sabbatical as a senior research fellow at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi. Returning to Bombay, he joined the Economic Department of Tatas.

This prestigious Tata department has been a stepping stone to an international career for many, and Dr Loui was selected to work for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). He was initially posted to work, after orientation at the UN headquarters in Vienna, in the East African Development Bank in Kampala, Uganda, from 1970 to 1973. The next posting was in Nairobi, capital of Kenya. One more posting was in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The next call of duty was in Free Town, capital of the West African country of Sierra Leone, as chief technical advisor for projects.

The year 1986 saw Dr Loui back in Uganda. The next phase of his professional life was with the Commonwealth Fund for Technical Cooperation, which took him to Namibia, Thailand (Bangkok) and Western Samoa in the Pacific Islands. In 1991, Dr. Loui’s tryst with international developmental organisations formally came to an end, though he was again commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund for an assignment in the Pacific Islands.

He had married May Fernandes, the eldest of the 12 children (six boys and six girls) of John and Muriel Fernandes of Falnir, a graduate trained teacher then, in May 1960. The couple has five children. Educated in Africa and the USA, three of their daughters are married – Nirmala, the eldest, and Vaneeta, the youngest, to Australians, and Vibha, the second daughter, to an American. The eldest son, Yeshvir, has migrated to Australia with his Mangalorean wife, while the second son, Lalit, has married an American and settled in the USA.

Apart from managing Amboseli in Bangalore, Dr Loui and May, who had set up home in the various cities where her husband was posted, took time off to visit their children in the USA and Australia. Believing in giving back to society something of what he has enjoyed through a rewarding career, Dr Loui supported a dozen children through their education. He worked on the governing body of the Fellowship for the Mentally Challenged.

In the midst of economic comfort, Dr Loui always remembered the lean days of his childhood, marked by the early demise of his father at the age of 48, and the sacrifices his widowed mother and his older brothers, the late Fr Sylvester SJ and the late Stany, made for his education. Dr Loui was part of a choir in Mangalore and needed to have a violin of his own. His mother raised the money by selling the gold chain given by her parents as dowry.

Dr Loui’s life was full of adventure, recounted in the book. He wrote that, while in Uganda (famous for Idi Amin’s depredations), he had to constantly live in fear of being mugged and robbed by unruly local men who used to roam around in trucks and take away cash, jewellery and domestic appliances, with armed men covering the scene – as was his experience once. While travelling by car for his daily work or otherwise, he had to keep $ 500 in cash ready to be given to the muggers – or run the risk of being shot by the frustrated and angry group on getting no booty for their labour! He was a man always ready for the unexpected and the new, and may that uplifting attitude in life smooth his path past St Peter’s Gates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By John B Monteiro
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Comment on this article

  • Therese Clancy, Sydney Australia

    Thu, Jul 01 2021

    Describing Louis as noble is so apt. A delightful man with a sense of noblesse oblige, he spent his life sharing the results of his good fortune and diligence with others less fortunate. I loved Louis, as I do his wife, May and thank my brother’s marriage to Nirmala for the opportunity to meet and know him. Thank you for such an insightful obituary and thanks for the life well-lived of Louis Monteiro and condolences to all his family and friends.

  • Vinod Wilfred Tauro, Madanthyar, Dubai

    Fri, Jun 04 2021

    Dear John Monteiro, many thanks for introducing great personality from Mangalore and beautiful elaborative writing, we appreciate your time. I read every articles written in Daiji and i enjoy reading it. May God bless you

  • PRAKASH DSOUZA, Mangalore- Auckland NZ

    Fri, Jun 04 2021

    Uncle Louie knowledge and willingness to help others out of his way has made a great difference and touched so many lives, having transformed people sharing his own knowledge and experience with others to accomplish their achievements – Even though he achieved the Phd qualification and did extremely well in his career, he stood Very simple, humble and noble in his life and cared for others We will miss Uncle louie for his great qualities forever and will remember the good things he has done and pray for his soul and for his eternal life Prakash Dsouza- Auckland NZ

  • Cecilia I. D'Souza, Bondel / Bahrain

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Our Deepest condolences to Aunty May , Nirmala, Yeshvir, Lalit, Vibha, Vaneeta and rest of the family members. Loui uncle is my mother's (Monica Gonsalves) first cousin and heard a lot about uncle from her. I never had a chance to meet him, but as kids we often visited Asses Maushi (my grandmother's younger sister). May God give you all the strength to bear this irreplaceable loss and may the fond memories of Uncle Loui help you get through the days. May his soul rest in eternal peace . Uncle John, thank you for penning this beautiful tribute to Uncle Loui. Cecilia I. D'Souza (Gonsalves) & fly Bondel / Bahrain

  • Sharmila & Dr Robert Coelho, Mangalore /Chennai

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Our Deepest condolences to Aunty May , Yeshvir , Neela & Dhruv and the rest of the Monteiro siblings and their families. May God give you the strength to bear this irreplaceable loss and may the loving memories of Uncle Loui help you get through the days. May his soul rest in eternal peace . This is a beautiful tribute to Uncle.

  • Dr Derek Lobo, Mangalore

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Patsy and I are immensely saddened to know about the passing away of Dr Loui Monteiro. I had childhood connections with his wife May and the Fernandes family of May Lodge-Falnir and had a special bond with Loui since we were, to the best of my knowledge, only two Catholics from St Aloysius College in all its 140 years of existence, to have had the privilege and honour of working for the United Nations as international staff - he in UNIDO or UNDP and I in the World Health Organization. When I was the President of the Catholic Association of South Kanara (CASK) during the Centenary Year (2013-2014), Loui made a substantial contribution towards the CASK Centenary projects. CASK also had the privilege of Reprinting of Seven Selected Books titled "Sadanchi Sheet-Kadi (Daily Rice-Curry) of his brother Fr Sylvester Monteiro S.J. in 2015. This was fully sponsored by Loui. I thank John Monteiro for highlighting the stellar journey, accomplishments and achievements of Loui who was certainly one of the great achievers of our community and deserved more recognition and honour. It is a pity that neither his alma mater St Aloysius College nor RACHANA bestowed Awards to Loui. I offer my sincere condolences to his wife May and all his children and extended family. Farewell Loui - You made our community proud - Dr Derek Lobo

  • John Monteiro, Bondel, Mangaluru

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Thank you all who have responded to my brief write-up on Dr. Aloysius (Loui) Monteiro, my eldest brother-in-law, after his demise on June 1, 2021. There was no conventional obituary announcement because he passed away past noon and was cremated the same evening. A traditional obituary announcement would have attracted many condolence messages considering the vast circle of relatives and friends with whom he kept in touch. Laurence and Jacinta Mendonca have a valid, honest and relevant observation: “We do not understand why great people come into the limelight only after their death ?” The answer, at least, in Dr Loui’s case, is that he was a humble person and never hankered after projecting himself. He might come one of these days to me in a dream to pull me up for breaking his code. In his autobiographical book, he says that he had written it for his grandchildren and beyond. A special thanks to the Daiji ‘elders’ for giving me a prime spot for the write-up on Dr Loui.

  • Lita Dsilva nee castelino, Kulshekar, Mangalore

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Dear Mr. Monteiro thank you for the write up about Dr. Louie . Normally we go through obituaries on daijiworld but nothing was mentioned but got the info from the US. Used to call him Louie maam since he was my mother’s first cousin. When I visited him some years ago he presented me the book he wrote “my journey from the village. “ I was happy to see my parents were mentioned Mary and Ligoury Castelino in his book. He has written everything in such detail somebody else would have Not mentioned some of the things. That shows his simplicity. Condolences to his family. Rest in peace Louie maam.

  • Yeshvir Jerome Monteiro, Mangalore/Sydney

    Thu, Jun 03 2021

    Dear Uncle John, Thank you for writing this about my Father. His passing has left a void in. our lives as he was closely engaged with his five children and 10 grandchildren until the final days through social media on his iPhone and iPAD. I would like especially to thank my cousin, Dr. Sherine and her husband, Dr. Adrian Braganza, who were with him day and night in hospital during his final days. The restrictions and lockdowns imposed by COVID made it impossible for any of his children to be there. We intend to celebrate his life in full when in passes.

  • Dr. Mohan Prabhu, Mangalore/Canada

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    Very sad to hear that Loui passed away soon after his 90th birthday. Loui I will pray for your eternal rest. Most likely I was your contemporary at St. Aloysius College as you are just two weeks younger to me but I do not remember knowing you then. The only time I would have met you would have been in November 2007 when you participated in the Diamond Reunion of SSLC class of SAC organized by me with the active support of Dr. Michael Lobo. I had attempted to contact Loui over the last several months with John Monteiro's help, but was unsuccessful. Thank you John for your narrative on Loui's liie story. It is very inspirational. I have known his brothers, especially his younger brothr Nobby whio was my buddy for nearly thirty years, right from our days in London to Ottawa until he was tragically killed in a car accident in 1990. And as well, his eldest brother Fr. Sylvester Monteiro from the time he was a scholastic and teacher at SAC when I was in the 4th Form, until very close to his last days in Mangalore. I also met his other brother Stany just by chance on a plane from Bombay to Mangalore many years ago. Stany seemed to have recognized me and spoke very briefly just before landing in Mangalore and introduced himself as Nobby's brother. I also met Loui's nephew ... Britto, who informed me that Loui had asked him to see me in Ottawa - that was a long time ago. I don't remember his first name. He had recently arrived in Canada. Thank you again John. And Loui, RIP. Mohan

  • alwyn, Mangalore

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    The life journey of Dr Loui has been captured without leaving a single piece of information. Its really a great snap shot by Mr. John. Having known Dr. Louie uncle for more than a decade, he was a good friend, guide and a advisor to me from the day I met him first. I have not seen such a person with simplicity, knowledge and approach for situations in once life. Having said that, Dr. had given me a copy of his book, A treasure house of Memories ' My Journey from the Village' . He has really walked the journey of life, in this book. He is very systematic and result oriented person. His focus on educating younger generation was great, he always says, these young boys and girls are the future of this Country. Education is the key, in all his dialogues when ever we used to spend spare time on weekends. His departure from amongst us has left us in vacuum, which is irreplaceable. I have no words to describe him more. Rest in peace, dear Uncle Louie. I MISS YOU A LOT.

  • Joe Lobo, Kulshekar, Bangalore

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    Dear Mr. John Monteiro, Thanks a lot for a summary of the life of Dr. A.D. Monteiro. You have done a splendid job of describing the multifaceted personality in a few sentences. Dr. Loui was first cousin of my mother, Christine( "Kittu" to him) and he had fondly remembered her in his autobiography, "My Journey from the Village". Just a few weeks back we had spoken over telephone for almost an hour and he was very keen to know as to how we celebrated the birth centenary of Kittu and he was quite pleased about our founding" Christine Lobo Birth Centenary Education Fund"God willing (insha Alla were his words!), he wanted to visit and meet her! Alas, it didn't happen. Dear Lawrence and Jacintha: Uncle Loui was quite active in Bangalore after his retirement. Besides running his consultancy business, he was Secretary of retired UN employees of Bangalore and had many collaborative events with our ICCR. In his autobiography he has given details of your family also. Names of Cecilia Pinto, Jacintha, Noel etc are also mentioned in the family tree (page 28). He was very fond of all h the members of his extended family and was an important part of our conversations! May his soul rest in peace....

  • Joe Lobo, Kulshekar, Bangalore

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    Dear Mr. John Monteiro, Thanks a lot for a summary of the life of Dr. A.D. Monteiro. You have done a splendid job of describing the multifaceted personality in a few sentences. Dr. Loui was first cousin of my mother, Christine( "Kittu" to him) and he had fondly remembered her in his autobiography, "My Journey from the Village". Just a few weeks back we had spoken over telephone for almost an hour and he was very keen to know as to how we celebrated the birth centenary of Kittu and he was quite pleased about our founding" Christine Lobo Birth Centenary Education Fund"God willing (insha Alla were his words!), he wanted to visit and meet her! Alas, it didn't happen. Dear Lawrence and Jacintha: Uncle Loui was quite active in Bangalore after his retirement. Besides running his consultancy business, he was Secretary of retired UN employees of Bangalore and had many collaborative events with our ICCR. In his autobiography he has given details of your family also. Names of Cecilia Pinto, Jacintha, Noel etc are also mentioned in the family tree (page 28). He was very fond of all h the members of his extended family and was an important part of our conversations! May his soul rest in peace....

  • Mohan Monteiro, Mumbai

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    A fitting tribute to a great man. We were all truly blessed to have him as a doyen of our family. He gave generously without asking in return - of his time, talents, wisdom and wealth. His legacy will be the many people who benefited from this generously, whose lives he touched and made better. Rest in peace, dear Uncle Louie. You will be missed.

  • lawrence Mendonca/jacintha Mendonca, Vamanjoor/ Dubai

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    Dear Mr. John Monteiro I We do not understand why great people come into limelight only after their death. He is the first cousin of my mother in law ,who is from Pachanady. We have been trying to meet him for the last 10 years ,but could not. Loui,s mother was living in Bondel near the church. Thank you for your article on him.

  • Adrian Braganza, Bangalore

    Wed, Jun 02 2021

    Superb round up of Dr Monteiro


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Title: Dr Aloysius (Loui) Monteiro, Globetrotting UN Economist, Calls it a Day



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